The least well-known yet most famous social enterprises

Hidden in plain sight

Photo by Kris Mikael Krister on Unsplash

Most of my presentations start off in the same way.

“Do you know what a social enterprise is?”

Normally the answer is either a ‘no’ or a ‘kinda’. However as soon as I mention a few companies as examples, most of the audience has a better idea, whilst others are in shock. They ask how it’s possible that they know of the company, and in some cases shop their regularly, but never knew they were a social enterprise.

The answer is simple. Social enterprise is such a new term that it’s easier to market the specific things you do, rather than using an umbrella term which should hit the nail on the head.

Patagonia

A certified B-Corp which just gets better and better each year in terms of their social and environmental impact, this global brand sells high quality outdoor clothing and gear.

In 8 years, their B Corp Impact score has increased from an inspiring 107.3 to a whopping 151.5. Considering most businesses score around 51 points, shows you how much they do.

They are on a constant adventure to stop the negative impact their business may have on the environment, analysing the way they design, manufacture and transport goods, improving and solving the problems they face.

None of this would have been possible, if it weren’t for the original founders of the clothing brand, along with partners from similar clothing lines. Mostly adrenalin junkies with a passion for nature, wildlife and conservation, their personal mission meant that the company has always lived and breathed its mission.

The Tompkins couple bought up land in the Patagonia region over the last 30 years to ensure it didn’t fall foul of private exploitation. Then recently their NGO donated 1 million acres of this land back to the government as national park land.

Ben & Jerry’s

Many people are surprised to hear that Ben & Jerry’s are a social enterprise, given that the company that actually owns them is the corporate beast Unilever.

However, when the Ben & Jerry’s story began, both Ben and Jerry created the company for financial, social and environmental purposes. They wanted the best conditions for their staff and only to have a relationship with farmers who raised and treated their dairy cows in a way that met their standards.

Ben & Jerry’s were bought out, chopped and changed for sure, however they exist as their own legal entity, and have always maintained their social mission to buy the best milk from the farmers that care. The proof is in the pudding — as they say — so check out their B Corp page where they scored 100 last time round.

HCT Group

One for our English readers more than anyone else, and even they might be a bit confused.

Surely you’ve heard of Transport for London (TfL), Metro in Leeds and MCT in Manchester?

HCT Group run a number of services up and down England, including bus services for these big players. Alongside this mainstream business, they run school buses, and transportation for people with special needs, be it physical or learning.

Being owned by a charity means that their profits are put back into even more community transportation projects, meaning the most isolated and most vulnerable can live independently.

Check out their routes here, who knows you may be using them already!


These are just a few examples of famous social enterprises who many people didn’t know the good they were doing. Within the sector, we often say at how bad we are at marketing ourselves. Therefore we’re always grateful when you, our customers, can share our cause and recommend us to those around you.

If you buy from a company that has a great social or environmental cause at its core, remember to tell everyone about them!