Encouraging Entrepreneurship in Teenagers

Through engaging, interactive and hands-on workshops

Photo by Rod Long on Unsplash

I was fortunate to have an amazing Business Studies teacher at secondary school. She inspired me to explore the world of business as I do today. She had the right approach with us, spoke with enthusiasm and energy and made her own clothes. She stood out from the rest for a number of other reasons too.

This was despite the fact that the majority of our work was paper or case study based.

We never set up a lemonade stand.

We never sold cookies door to door.

We only once had to come up with business ideas.

[Mine were a penbrella and bodybrella, I don’t think I need to elaborate further. Perhaps both more revealing of where I grew up rather than my business acumen at that age.]

Fast forward 18 years, and I find myself teaching teenagers very similar things albeit with the modern jargon, theories and tools. What I did decide though, was things would be more teenager proof, and to do this I shook things up.

Make it relevant

‘Sir, I’m never gonna use this in the future.’

We’ve all heard it, and some of you may have said it, but when you’re doing Pythagorean theorem for the 124th time you do start to wonder whether you’ll need to remember those equations in your adult life.

There has been a shift to show students how they will use things they learn in school later on, but let’s be honest, at 15 you’re only thinking about liking posts on Instagram, playing on your PlayStation, hanging out with friends etc. Your future is far from your mind.

So, in order to make entrepreneurship relevant, we come up with a product or service that they can actually offer or produce. A lot easier when working with vocational schools for sure, but normally you’ll find two or three students that have a skill or hobby which can be used. If there really isn’t anything then let the students come up with something new. Even if it’s not reasonable they’ll soon realise this and change.

Once the product is theirs, and they want it to succeed, everything they do is now relevant. They’re not being asked to think about a case study of another business, or fake numbers from a book, but instead really look into their own idea and see whether it’s feasible or not.

Accountability

Normally we use exams as a way to get kids studying. As the exam period nears, stress increases and for the majority, so does the amount of studying. However, as we know, stress isn’t a great thing and we’d all prefer to avoid that dread. Luckily, accountability can come in many forms.

To do this with entrepreneurship, we set an initial date to launch their product or idea. In some cases, I must admit, this date has been delayed, but that accountability ensured buy-in from the students. Stress still plays a part, as they are mainly motivated by the air of worry that if they didn’t have something to show, they’d be stood there in front of hundreds of people expecting something. When they are engaged though, they want something to be proud of instead.

Further to that, and since I focus on social entrepreneurship, we stick to a promise that they decide how the profit is spent, as long as it is school related — a trip, a party, contributions to their graduation ball, it’s all in their hands. Most recently the class decided to plant a tree and have a class party.

The more work they put in, the higher chance of success, and therefore the potential to fund something amazing from their profits.

Feed them the way they like

Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat, Viber, YouTube. The list goes on. Messaging, images and videos. Read or record and send. Flick through. Double tap. Like, love, laugh, get angry or cry. Three seconds to make that decision. Next video, next photo.

Whether you agree with it or not, this is how teens access information these days. I asked a 15 year old which site she reads the news on. Her answer was Instagram, as it was quick and easy to understand. No wonder certain celebrities or politicians do so well.

How do you translate this into the classroom?

Fast decision-making, but with the knowledge that you can always improve or change them later on.

Short, snappy tasks with a time limit no longer than a YouTube video or pop song. That’s all the attention you’ll probably get. If you have a bigger task, break it down.

Individual, partner work or small teams, just like on SnapChat. Be clear which one you are after from the outset.

Let’s not forget, actually utilising the tools they use. Record them practising their pitch and put it on a private YouTube link for them to watch. Get them creating advertising campaigns including photos and videos using hashtags.

This is their domain, listen to their ideas.

I’m not a teacher

I’m in a lucky position. With most of the students I work with, I’m only there for half a day every two weeks, at most. The ‘teacher’ effect never has a chance to sink in. Similar to the differences between being the parent or the uncle/aunt, I benefit from being fairly novel and never the disciplinarian.

Since entrepreneurship is a process of trial and error, test and improve, you need to adopt a slightly different role anyway. There are steps we can follow, but there is no single equation that will lead to success. There are gut feelings and sometimes a sense of doing things for the sake of it. You can’t teach these things, and therefore your role here is as a mentor or guide.

Decision-making should be taken on by all, success or failure is a shared concept and you’re there to introduce themes or topics, keep things moving forward and provide structure. If you feel you’re propping the project up, then you’ve gone wrong somewhere. If you’re the only one running around before the launch day, you haven’t removed your teacher shackles.

So make sure you start as you mean to go on, get the students owning the project, making the decision and doing the work largely without your input.


I hope you’ve been extremely underwhelmed by the suggestions above. They are nothing novel, unique, and have been done numerous times in many places.

Ask yourself, are they being done at my local school, are the teachers doing similar things, are the students learning in an engaging way.

If the answer is no, then it’s time to try and change it, and demand a better, more hands-on, interesting and revitalised way of teaching.

Types of Social Enterprise — WISE

A people-centred approach

Photo by Raoul Ortega on Unsplash

One of the oldest forms of social enterprise is called WISE — a work integration social enterprise. This is a social enterprise whose main priority is to provide employment to a specific group of people, often hard-to-employ or vulnerable.

Existing WISEs cover a wide spectrum of sectors, from clothes-making to factory-line work, and from landscaping companies to massage parlours. Just like social enterprise, you will find examples of WISE across the world, and perhaps in your own back yard.

WISEs used to be predominantly run adjacent to a non-profit organisation. This way they could provide tailor made work positions so their service users could find employment. It also meant that care could also be delivered at the same time, increasing the chances of successful employment and sustainability for both the company and individual.

Every WISE is different with its reasons for establishing itself for the sole person of employing a certain group of people.

Here are some examples as to why WISEs might be set up.

To provide a safe and stable route back to work

Imagine you’ve been out of work for over two years. You haven’t had a steady income, nor have you done a nine-to-five for a long time. Your skills might be a rusty, and maybe you’ve sort of forgotten how to socialise or behave in the workplace.

This description could be someone returning from maternity leave, someone off sick for a long period, someone leaving jail, or someone recovering from an addiction, to name a few examples. Such a wide range of individuals yet all with a similar common need — a safe place to work where they know the people and the pressure is off a little.

Many WISEs have been set up just for this — a stepping stone to get back into the working world. Perhaps through a contract job to give the person the confidence to find a job after. Or maybe that individual will always work in this safe and stable place. In some cases, certain WISEs crossover with support workers from their or another non-profit to provide a holistic service so that those starting work again are fully supported.

To offer flexible job positions

Not everyone has the ability to work full time, nor regular hours. This could be down to health, time availability, other responsibilities as well as many other factors.

With this in mind, some WISEs were set up that understood the needs of their workers, and could offer the flexible job position that meant those individuals could work to the best of their abilities or to a timetable that suited them.

It may sound like a nightmare to some business owners — a workforce of flexible work positions. However with a bit of ingenuity and innovation, and when your first priority isn’t profit, these WISEs were able to flourish to provide immense social impact. Don’t forget though — WISEs are generally still for profit organisations.

Fortunately, we have seen a shift within the private sector to be more flexible when it comes to working hours and contracts, meaning employment is a lot more accessible than it used to be. Therefore the need for this sort of WISE has decreased over the years.

To meet a need in the labour market

With sectors fluctuating, governments changing their employment priorities and different occupations moving in and out of fashion, there are often skilled people who find themselves out of demand.

Shipping communities, mining communities or where the garment industry was once rife, have all changed. These industries have, for the most part, vanished or moved abroad. Where they used to employ half a village or town, we find large groups of unemployed people.

Certain WISEs have set up to reemploy them in the same industry. You see this quite often happen with tailors, craftspeople and farmers. WISEs saw the opportunity to harness the local human capital and turn it into a sustainable business.

On top of this, we can think about all the skills needed in the aforementioned industries. Instead of creating the same sector, some WISEs take this certain group of people and reskill them. By using their basic knowledge from their previous profession yet applying it in a different way, they can create new sectors and new jobs for them.


If you work with individuals needing help to return to work , or if you’re thinking about starting a social enterprise to meet one of the needs above, then perhaps you should look at existing WISEs to see what models work for them. Reach out, do a bit of research, and make a good plan so your social enterprise will thrive. 

Social Enterprise in Focus : Who gives a crap? Australia

We’ve mentioned them before, and we’ll talk a bit more about them this time.

who gives a crap? is a social enterprise in Australia who sells toilet roll. Yes, toilet roll. They have a fitting name, an excellent mission and if you keep an eye on their social media sites, some hilarious marketing. They’ve since spread their operations to the U.S. and the U.K., and we hope to see their products in a supermarket near us all very soon.

They’re a great example of the triple bottom line, and deliver an interesting operation with elements of both the integrated and external social enterprise models:

People – with more people having mobile phones than toilets, they recognised the problem in in worldwide sanitation. Their mission is to reduce the -roughly- 40% of people who don’t have access to a toilet and improve the health and wellbeing of these people.

Planet – all the materials they source are forest friendly or recycled. This means they significantly reduce their carbon footprint and yours too – think about how many trees you flush down the toilet.

Profit – they donate 50% of their profits to partners also working in the field of sanitation- currently WaterAid and Sanergy.

If you want to find out about their more recent impact and good work – check out their ‘crap update‘. Otherwise, pop to their web shop and stock up on some toilet paper.

Social Enterprise in Focus : Ghana Bamboo Bikes, Ghana

You may read about the blue economy. The main goal is to source solve problems through what is available locally, without creating waste. This social enterprise from Ghana did just that.

Grown in Ghana, used in Ghana

With seven native species of bamboo locally, Ghana Bamboo Bikes has taken this readily available material and turned it into a social and environmental solution. They build and sell bikes as well as run a bike academy.

Socially, they create employment by first training people, most often women and some areas with a focus on youth, in how to assemble the bikes. Some of these individuals are employees whilst others have the chance to open their own bike shop anywhere in the country.

Meanwhile, on an environmental level they employ ten farmers to manage their bamboo plantations. Bamboo is as an alternative for existing fuel sources which can improve local forests and reduce soil erosion.

With one material they are doing so much for their country, you can read more about their impact here.

Your turn

Now think about what you have locally. Is there something growing in abundance that can be used to replace something man-made? There are lots of examples on the blue economy website so have a look and learn more.

Social Enterprise in Focus : Pana, Albania

We were recently at #Impact2018, a conference in Zagreb, Croatia sharing the regional heroes and heroins in social entrepreneurship, impact investing and corporate social responsibility. As part of this conference, a few social entrepreneurs got the chance to pitch their idea, and Pana‘s story stuck with us, so we thought we would catch up with Pezana to find out more.

There’s a special story behind Pana – can you tell us how the social enterprise started and what inspired you?

Everything started 5 years ago in my home town Tirana. A mix of events were happening in my personal life. Working with orphans and children with disabilities made me understand that projects don’t change their lives, but a profession CAN! My father was a mechanical engineer and he had golden hands. He was able to produce anything with wood. After he retired he wanted to give his knowledge to others, but most of the people look at those retired as not being able to work. As an architect, I saw the gap in the market of unique design furniture, since most of the actual products come from China and Italy and are not tailor-made. There was also a problem in two different areas – losing the heritage of carpenters and also a drop in Albanian manufacturing. In April 2013, Pana was created as a result of all these factors, by taking part in a competition for green ideas and social enterprise organized by an Albanian organization, where surprisingly we won the first place. This was our way to bring Pana to life.

What are Pana’s plans for the next five years?

This is a very tricky question and actually very important. As most of you know, Albania is a very small country and of course has limited resources when it comes to such a niche product like ours. In fact, we do have a lot of orders and usually our clients wait for 2-3 months to get their products, but still this is not enough for us. Our products have totally another monetary value in European countries. Today we sell our product in Albania with lower prices than they should be sold, due to the capacity of Albanians of paying. That’s why we want to expand to other European countries so we can give a real value and price to our products, an element that would help us to grow the number of employees and the value that Albania as a country can have in the European community. So we are working hard in different directions to expand the production and begin to sell our products internationally. Our big dream is to sell our products outside Albania, we see it as the only way to manage to have a bigger impact, a bigger impact on the clients, and to bring the Albanian name to the foreign market. What is more important is having more family members, as the people we are working with are not just employees but part of the big family of Pana.

As a social enterprise, how do you balance your triple bottom line of people, planet and profit?

Pana is only about that, making a balance between the social and ecological mission. Its one of the few cases where both the impacts are equally as important and take the same weight inside the enterprise. Profit is only a mechanism to make the whole structure work. For us, it’s important only to make the structure work properly, living in a country like Albania where the social and ecological part is not something important for our clients, has made us work very hard to have the stability that we do have today (economical). Most of our clients don’t even want to know with whom we are working and what are we saving, that’s why our work and value is underestimated, but this has been another fight for us to educate our clients. We do work hard as just another enterprise that is trying to gain some points in the chaotic Albanian market, but in the mean time to have the balance between social and ecological. During those 5 years we have trained more than 70 people to become carpenters, because for us it doesn’t matter if they are going to work with us, for us it matters for them to have a profession. The family of Pana is so diverse you can find people from 19 years until 73, those coming from Roma community, orphans, retired, returned emigrants, people with disabilities, the list goes on, but we all work together with the same mission and vision.

What’s the current state of social entrepreneurship in Albania and how are you a part of developing it?

Things are going very slowly; and I know the reason why. It looks like there is no collaboration between different entities in Albania. The government is not there to help and manage to give a hand to the new startups and the ecosystem is very aggressive. It’s now an organized market which makes things go wrong sometimes, not because of the entrepreneur but because of corruption, high taxes, lack of financial support and even training. There are some entities trying to make a change, but even the entrepreneurs are very sporadic. There’s a whole generation that is missing the desire to create new things and this could be because the education system is not supporting them to become entrepreneurs. There is a lot of work to be done. In my case, wherever there is a possibility to inspire and give my knowledge, I do it, of course if they gave me the opportunity to make more I would have loved to do it, but until now this is not the case. I am doing my best in the Albanian conditions.

What advice you would give to wannabe social entrepreneurs around the world?

Being a social entrepreneur its one of the most difficult things in life (at least for me) , but when it goes right then the result is outstanding. If you like difficulties and adventure take this trip, it’s a life-changing experience for you and the people that you are trying to change. Besides how hard it is, I can continue forever like this, as Mother Theresa said once: It’s not how much we give but how much love we put into giving.


A very honest and informative interview from Pana, and one that many of us can relate to. How collaborative are the government in your country? The need for strong cross-sector relationships can ensure social entrepreneurship expands and succeeds, however many people working in the ministry of education or work don’t know much about what social entrepreneurship is. We try to change this through holding lectures and workshops, and if you’re a social entrepreneur, offer your knowledge too!

Social Enterprise in Focus : Dastadast, Iran

As part of our goal to showcase social enterprise from all around the world, we’re off to Iran this month, for a short interview with the team at Dastadast.

Give us a brief overview of what you do.

We founded Dastadast 4 years ago, becoming the first Iranian online non-profit social enterprise. We started with a small budget provided by Dastadast founders and can currently survive with small funds because we are volunteer-based. Our volunteers contribute their skills, time and knowledge to create change.

We run an online market for handicrafts made for individuals who don’t have fair access to market, including immigrants, villagers, women, youth who recently started working and the creators of traditional heritage crafts which are in danger of extinction.

What are your main goals and how do you achieve them?

The most important mission is to empower handcraft producers and we do this by selling their products online. One of the main intentions of Dastadast is the empowerment of women. Our social impact so far is that we currently cooperate with 400 women from 15 provinces of Iran. These make up approximately 90 percent of our producers.

 

In order to achieve this goal, we currently do the following:
•  Provide a vast market —  e.g., online and seasonal markets
•  Exclude large dealers
•  Introduce producers and giving them full control on prices
•  Cooperate with empowerment groups, rural cycles and environmental NGOs
•  Use professional designing to re-design the products and achieve higher quality

 

What is the current situation for social enterprise? what advice would you offer anyone who wants to become a social entrepreneur?

There is currently no model for social enterprise in Iran. This said, there are few groups who use social entrepreneurship to create impact. Entrepreneurs should be very patient and believe in their goal. They need to study and know the effects they may make and make sure the solutions they propose are according to sustainable development principles and do not cause any damage.
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This is another example of social enterprise developing in a place where social entrepreneurship is little known or developed. No matter where you live, there are always others trying to develop this field, so reach out, share ideas and help it grow.

Social Enterprise in Focus : Triciclos, Brazil

We love reading news about social enterprise and recently we shifted our attentions to what was happening in South America. This is where we came across Triciclos, a certified B-Corp social enterprise based in Brazil. They were set up in 2009 and offer a range of initiatives that support their triple bottom line efforts.

Triciclos aim to reduce waste and create circular economies. They do this by educating individuals and organisations about how to be more sustainable in their daily life. They work with large companies such as CocaCola, Walmart and Nestle to increase their impact as well as visiting schools to engage students in recycling.

Their environmental impact is phenomenal. They collect a range of materials to recycle, from places that didn’t have the opportunity to recycle before. Through their various processes, they recycle these materials, completing the cycle.

On top of this, they scored a whopping 135 in their BCorp certification process proving their commitment to their staff, community, environment and governance. Furthermore, they check the positive impact of any supplier they deal with.

They are growing across South America, now in Brazil and Chile. Initiatives like this are welcome all around the world where we see plastic, glass and rubbish spoiling nature and causing animal deaths.

 

 

Social Enterprise in Focus : Auara, Spain

We took a break from blogging in August. Now we’re back with a splash, quite literally, to talk to you about this social enterprise from Spain – Auara.

A twist from the traditional bottled water

‘The water with values’ has taken quite a huge step forward by placing itself as a social enterprise selling bottled water. Auara reinvests 100% of its dividends in providing safe drinkable water to those who need it as well as watching their environmental impact by using only bottles made from recycled plastic. The water itself is ‘homegrown’ from León in northwest Spain.

Furthermore, they don’t simply donate their profits to NGOs working in the field of safer water. Instead they involve themselves and work with local partners, providing them with co-financing. This way they can be there on the field, be a part of and see the social impact first hand. This allows them to be more confident and transparent when reporting to others.

Social and environmental impact

You may have heard that some companies are water grabbing or getting concessions on underwater reservoirs. Sometimes even underneath populations who don’t even have access to clean drinking water. Well here is a social enterprise working to provide everyone with access to that very thing. You can even stock their water if you want to or become an ambassador, so find out more on their ambassador page.

Social Enterprise in Focus : Electra Energy, Greece

Greece has been in the news far more than it probably wanted to over the past few years. Everyone knows about the beauty and history of the great country, however recently the focus has been on the economy and refugee crisis. In response to this, a number of initiatives have started, and the social enterprise sector has taken off. We managed to talk in-depth to Ignacio Navarro, general manager of the social co-operative Electra Energy, a Greek cooperative enterprise that focuses on the development of renewable energy social investments, aiming to produce, manage and commercialise renewable energy to it’s members and other communities.

Why and how did you start Electra Energy?

Back in 2016, the team of Electra worked together to set up investment plans for residents and farmers communities of the Region of Lamia (a rural town in Central Greece) aiming to replace their oil burning furnaces with biomass systems that burn leftover olive trees cuttings to produce heat and hot water. As a result of this promotion, the Municipality proposed the development of the first bio-energy school community of the Region, turning the old oil boiler into a biomass combustion unit, and engaging the local community to clean their forests and provide their feed-stock to the school. The project served as inspiration to the founding members in the ambition of setting up a legal enterprise and promote initial services, technical consultancy and networking.

Electra Energy was thus launched in September of 2016, and the main purpose is to create job opportunities through the promotion and development of collective investments on renewable energy. Electra forms part of an Eco-system of social enterprises related to the promotion of sustainable energy, and it is co-partner of the organization SEYN (Sustainable Energy Youth Network) a non profit organization established in Belgium, who act as a mentoring and educational body for new entrepreneurs interested on the promotion of sustainable energy transitions.

What legal form did you adopt and how does this help or hinder you?

In Greece there are many different cooperatives enterprises which operate under different frameworks and operational rules. Electra Energy Cooperative was launched as a “KoinSEp -Koinonikes Sindeteristikes Epixiriseis N4430/2016”, defined as an economic, business, productive and social activities undertaken by companies or associations, whose purpose is the pursuit of collective benefit and service general social interest.

Compared to other existing frameworks, this legal form is the most flexible and involves less financial and legal risks to its members, a fact that was crucial during the constitution since the founding members wanted to test the business approach by running the minimum cost and risks at least during the initial steps, and it was also the form requiring less amount of administrative work and time for it’s constitution.

What are the social and environmental goals that get funded through your profit?

Our goal is to find collective investments to develop and produce renewable energy in Greece, and to be able to be launched as an energy supplier to compete in the local markets, always aiming to the social added value of giving open membership, participation and support to new and existing members.

During the first ten months of operation, we have focused on community engagement, networking with potential stakeholders, and identifying project opportunities that align with the principles and objectives of the organization. Right now the cooperative is initiating the permiting process for a small wind turbine in North Greece and participating in the legal work to allow better legislation to allow an investment on solar self consumption for multiple tenants.

The cooperative aims it’s economical activity to grow and attract social investments based on the principle of “renewable energy as a common good”. A common is a shared resource managed by a community who create rules to make the resource durable. The resource cannot be monopolized by one or a group of individuals. We aim to create business models that preserves these principles while contributing to create innovative and smart products and services to improve the quality and efficient of the Greek energy market. Electra Energy business activity aims to be aligned with three basic principes of the cooperatives enterprises (International Cooperatives Alliance): Fair and Easy Access to Common Goods, Energy Tranition in the Hands of Citizens and Fair Supply.

How have you managed to cope through this difficult financial time?

First steps are never easy and specially for a new enterprise. We also find obstacles in working with public authorities and speeding up licensing processes for the development of first projects that could bring us income. Out of the 9 founding members, 4 are unemployed, only one is part time employed in the cooperative and all the rest work on volunteer basis. However, from the beginning we all planned a two year grace period until we expect any substantial incomes that could cover at least some full time jobs within the organization. We currently have support from a German social investor, a lady aware of the Greek situation who liked our model and ambition and decided to cover some of the operational expensive until the cooperative can become self sustainable from it’s activities.

What advice would you have for would-be social enterpreneurs?

If there is anything I had to choose to say to them, (it would be to) work with people you like, have fun doing what you do, even if the idea is full of risks, always ask for help and advice but most importantly, don’t listen to all advice. Taking risks is a part of the activity and social entrepreneurship is full of risks and unknown paths. We may find that sometimes people tell us that what we are aiming to do is not possible, but it is, so remember to be open to advice but, always learn to trust your gut.

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A special thanks to Ignacio for a very informative interview about Electra, providing us with a few links to find out more about commons and the International Co-operatives Alliance. Feel free to join the SEYN network as well if you are involved in the field of sustainable energy.

Social Enterprise in Focus : New Leaf, Cambodia

Siem Reap, Cambodia holds a very special place in our heart as Michael spent 20 months working and volunteering there. He will never forget the huge smiles of the locals, the connection to nature, the rainy and the dry season and the friends he has there. Siem Reap is quite a hub when it comes to social enterprise, with a few examples dotted in and around the town.

One of these is New Leaf, a restaurant in Siem Reap that was established to provide financial support to charities engaged in education in Siem Reap province. It was set up solely for this reason as Ian & Georgina (the founders) had no other reason to establish a business here. We caught up with Ian to find out more:

Cambodia is a developing country, what’s the legal situation for social enterprise and how do you work?
As no legal framework exists for social enterprises in Cambodia, New Leaf was established as a sole proprietorship. As such New Leaf incurs tax as a normal business would. Setting up as an NGO was not an option as the primary activity of New Leaf is food & beverages, with only occasional direct engagement with those in need.

So what makes New Leaf a social enterprise?
New Leaf donated 100% of its profits to local charities until end 2016. Now New Leaf donates 30% to charity and 20% is shared by New Leaf’s Khmer staff. To date New Leaf has donated around US$40,000 to 15 charities.

What were the initial steps in starting the business and how does it run now?
Georgina and I worked on a business plan to assess the financial viability and subsequently the restaurant was fully financed by myself, Georgina and Eugene (a friend of mine). The idea was to create a business that was run by Khmer (Cambodians) to help Khmer. Neither myself nor Georgina planned to stay in Cambodia though – so we planned to manage it from overseas with periodic visits.

What challenges have you faced since setting up?
As a social enterprise, New Leaf operates as a responsible employer (fair wages, staff training etc) and champions environmental responsibility. Finding the optimal balance between these responsibilities and maximising its impact through profits adds to the challenge of being successful as a restaurant.

For example, the minimum compensation levels at several charities are significantly higher than a standard waitress wage. Therefore the decision to pay 20% of profits to our staff was (in part) driven by this.

What advice would you offer social entrepreneurs?
My advice to social entrepreneurs would be to focus on the business side first. If you are successful as an entrepreneur, then your ability to deliver social benefits is significantly improved. Before we opened I would say “if New Leaf loses money then we are just a loss-making business with no social impact.”
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Another example that no matter what your business is, it can be a social enterprise with the right planning and goals. As Ian said, making sure your idea is financially viable is so important, and we can work with you to test your idea. Lots of people have big hearts, but we need to make sure the business head is there too.