Clarifying positive impact

Finding the real meaning

As the effect of Silicon Valley ripples through each country, sector and entrepreneur, I’ve witnessed both the positive and negative changes.

An abundance of money is being pumped into startups all over the world, whether or not they actually have a working prototype or in some cases, a feasible idea. Fine, it’s your money (well kinda), you can invest it where you want.

Then you had the philanthropists, who were looking to donate large amounts of money to green or social projects. Excellent, with both government funding and donations decreasing, there’s a funding gap to be filled.

More recently, social entrepreneurship has found its footing and is starting to become prevalent in some countries. Legal structures have been formed, governments have set up policies and strategies, and universities have started teaching it. Now we have impact investment, and funds for impact companies.

What is impact investment?

In a nutshell, impact investment follows the usual rules of any investment. The investors are looking for a return over a number of years and will also have equity in the company.

However with impact investment the return isn’t just financial, but can be linked to a number of social or environmental indicators. These indicators tie in nicely with what the organisation sets out to do generally, or through a specific project.

For example, if an impact fund invests in a company selling affordable water filters, the fund will look for two things:

A financial return — the product itself has to make a profit in order for the company to be able to offer a return on investment at a certain percentage

A social or environmental return — the product has to have a positive impact on the buyers life that can be measured and thus relayed back to the fund.

What’s happening now?

As more and more funds have opened across Europe and the world, we have started to see a large change in the way they classify impact and social return.

You have the ‘purists’ who focus on specific problems such as hunger, housing or education, but then there are other funds that leave it open to interpretation.

Is xyz, a tea company really having a positive social impact on their drinkers so much so that they receive these funds? Perhaps if they are employing a certain community, developing educational opportunities there and paying them a living wage, most of which wouldn’t be possible otherwise.

Is abc, a new taxi app really changing the way we commute in a way that returns something valuable to all? Perhaps if the fleet is only made up of electric cars, or there are subsidised services for certain customers.

Have a think yourself at recently awarded funds. Would you class them all as impact-focused companies?

Impact is impact, no matter large or small though.

That’s the argument put to me when I ask. As long as you can come up with an appropriate reason for getting the funds, then it seems that any impact flies.

I think we have to really ask ourselves a few questions:

Are there not enough social entrepreneurs out there generally?
Or not enough applying for these funds that impact gets diluted?
Or do the funds want to prioritise the financial return that ‘purists’ may simply not be able to offer?

Whatever the reason, and whatever your point of view, it’s great to see that there are funds now for the causes, projects and organisations that are committed to producing real, positive, social and environmental impact. If you’re one of them, make sure you access the finance made for you, and stop abc and xyz to it!

Social Enterprise in Focus : ImpacTrip, Portugal

With social entrepreneurship a fairly underdeveloped sector in Croatia, it’s no surprise that whenever there is a social entrepreneur in town you soon hear about them.

That’s what happened recently with ImpactTrip, as they were in Split to look at expanding their operations. As a registered B Corp, they run a hostel in Portugal as well as offering voluntourism trips to a number of locations.

We caught up with one of their employees to find out more, their history, plans today and plan for the future.

Where did the idea for ImpacTrip come from?

In 2013 Rita, one of ImpacTrip founders traveled through Asia and returned to Portugal with the idea of creating a positive impact in the communities where travelers are. Rita is a “serial traveler” and her previous experiences around the world made her understand that it is necessary a shift in the way people travel, it is important to do it in a responsible and sustainable way. Later Diogo joined her, and both understood that the best way to achieve it would be through volunteering experiences in local non-profit projects, in a way that both, travelers and local organizations could benefit from it. 

What are the main social and environmental goals of ImpacTrip?

Traveling in a responsible and sustainable way creating positive social and environmental impact locally is the main social/environmental goal of ImpacTrip. We can achieve it by supporting our social and environmental partners, giving them the human resources needed to achieve their goals and their mission, and stimulating new connections between causes and non-profits These partners are chosen according to their relevance and mission, so they need to be in accordance with at least one of the Sustainable Development Goals. 

How are you hoping to improve your BCorp score in the future?

We are working hard on the quality of our project processes. We believe that improving our evaluation methods and working even closer to our social and environmental partner our impact will grow continuously. Moreover, by expanding our operational area, we will be able to reinvest in more projects, built a bigger team and it will allow us to improve our score. 

What advice would you offer anyone thinking about going into the world of social enterprise?

Be, above all, idealist and resilient. It is very important to have clear in our mind our goals and what we want to achieve; then we can’t give up. There will be a lot of ups and downs, a lot of challenges, obstacles but the results give us enormous satisfaction and motivation to keep going and doing a positive impact everywhere and on everyone around us. 


So if you’re thinking about travelling more conscientiously, why not check out what ImpacTrip have to offer, or at least take a leaf out of their book and think about the way you travel.

The least well-known yet most famous social enterprises

Hidden in plain sight

Photo by Kris Mikael Krister on Unsplash

Most of my presentations start off in the same way.

“Do you know what a social enterprise is?”

Normally the answer is either a ‘no’ or a ‘kinda’. However as soon as I mention a few companies as examples, most of the audience has a better idea, whilst others are in shock. They ask how it’s possible that they know of the company, and in some cases shop their regularly, but never knew they were a social enterprise.

The answer is simple. Social enterprise is such a new term that it’s easier to market the specific things you do, rather than using an umbrella term which should hit the nail on the head.

Patagonia

A certified B-Corp which just gets better and better each year in terms of their social and environmental impact, this global brand sells high quality outdoor clothing and gear.

In 8 years, their B Corp Impact score has increased from an inspiring 107.3 to a whopping 151.5. Considering most businesses score around 51 points, shows you how much they do.

They are on a constant adventure to stop the negative impact their business may have on the environment, analysing the way they design, manufacture and transport goods, improving and solving the problems they face.

None of this would have been possible, if it weren’t for the original founders of the clothing brand, along with partners from similar clothing lines. Mostly adrenalin junkies with a passion for nature, wildlife and conservation, their personal mission meant that the company has always lived and breathed its mission.

The Tompkins couple bought up land in the Patagonia region over the last 30 years to ensure it didn’t fall foul of private exploitation. Then recently their NGO donated 1 million acres of this land back to the government as national park land.

Ben & Jerry’s

Many people are surprised to hear that Ben & Jerry’s are a social enterprise, given that the company that actually owns them is the corporate beast Unilever.

However, when the Ben & Jerry’s story began, both Ben and Jerry created the company for financial, social and environmental purposes. They wanted the best conditions for their staff and only to have a relationship with farmers who raised and treated their dairy cows in a way that met their standards.

Ben & Jerry’s were bought out, chopped and changed for sure, however they exist as their own legal entity, and have always maintained their social mission to buy the best milk from the farmers that care. The proof is in the pudding — as they say — so check out their B Corp page where they scored 100 last time round.

HCT Group

One for our English readers more than anyone else, and even they might be a bit confused.

Surely you’ve heard of Transport for London (TfL), Metro in Leeds and MCT in Manchester?

HCT Group run a number of services up and down England, including bus services for these big players. Alongside this mainstream business, they run school buses, and transportation for people with special needs, be it physical or learning.

Being owned by a charity means that their profits are put back into even more community transportation projects, meaning the most isolated and most vulnerable can live independently.

Check out their routes here, who knows you may be using them already!


These are just a few examples of famous social enterprises who many people didn’t know the good they were doing. Within the sector, we often say at how bad we are at marketing ourselves. Therefore we’re always grateful when you, our customers, can share our cause and recommend us to those around you.

If you buy from a company that has a great social or environmental cause at its core, remember to tell everyone about them!

Types of Social Enterprise — Embedded Models

A seamless model of impact and profit

Having previously looked at the external and integrated models, we move to the third model of social enterprise — the embedded model.

Impact and profit sources are the same

This model rarely exists unless the organisation was born as a social enterprise, as advanced planning and strategical thinking is required.

Put simply — it’s when the product or service you are offering, directly solves one of the social or environmental needs you set out to solve. Each unit or hour that you sell, has a direct positive impact which goes towards achieving your mission and vision.

It goes a lot further than the integrated model with this direct approach, as everything done is intentionally. A product design phase may have taken place to adapt or improve an existing product or service on the market to make it social enterprise appropriate.


Example 1 — Sanergy

One of my favourite social enterprises to talk about, Sanergy not only provided a simple solution to a growing problem, they went further and ensured there was a circular economy within what they do.

First off, they build what are effectively toilets in a portable style for slums and communities without toilets. These are franchised out to local entrepreneurs that can then make money in maintaining and offering them. Straight away, the toilet provides an income for an individual, whilst providing everyone else a safer, cleaner place to do their business.

Next up, the waste is collected from all of the Sanergy toilets. This means there isn’t illegal dumping or the need to build complex infrastructure that requires a large amount of time and funds, and can lead to the upheaval of communities. Once again, this provides further jobs.

Finally, with that waste, they treat it and turn it into further products such as fertilizer that local farmers can then use instead of potentially harmful chemicals.

It goes without saying, the amount of impact Sanergy must have on the community is mind-blowing, all through leasing of toilets!

Example 2 — Grameen Bank

Grameen Bank was founded by perhaps the most well-known social entrepreneur Muhammad Yunus. They started off by offering microloans to people needing money to start or expand their business.

A fairly common service in developing countries right? Grameen Bank went many steps further to ensure it had an embedded business model.

The loans mainly target female entrepreneurs across Bangladesh, a country where in some parts women are shunned when it comes to owning or running a businesses.

Furthermore, it is a co-operative, and anyone borrowing money from GB is a member, meaning trust and participation is needed in order to successfully apply for a loan.

Finally, the interest charged on the loan is reinvested in other individuals applying for a loan. It is in this way that the simple offering of a loan, has turned into a sustainable social business where strategical decisions are influenced by those borrowing. The funds available to others across Bangladesh has grown exponentially, since there isn’t a group of stakeholders who are paying themselves bonuses.

Just like with Sanergy, the value comes directly from the ‘product’ itself — promoting equality, encouraging entrepreneurship, independence, financial literacy and economic growth.


This is social enterprise at its purest, where a problem was identified and a solution directly developed to solve the problem. Through the problem solving process, stakeholders, sustainability and impact were taken into consideration to produce a cycle that keeps giving.

Perhaps you have a social or environmental problem that you think you could solve? We would love to help you make it viable and sustainable. 

Applying the Theory of Change

Demonstrating your social enterprise’s worth

If you work for a non-profit, social enterprise or do anything that aims to have a positive social or environmental effect, then you might have thought about your theory of change.

Your theory of change should show how what you do, has an impact more far reaching than just on your customers and users. It should also show how you aim to create impact for longer than just the instance they buy your product or use your service.

It’s a strategic piece of work that can set down the foundations for your business, test your assumptions and ensure you have indicators to show the world how great you are. So let’s delve a little deeper into what’s involved.


When you started your organisation or project, you would have seen a problem you were hoping to solve. This provides your context that your theory of change relates to.

On top of this, you would have most likely stated your mission and vision. Ultimately the goals you, as an individual or group of individuals, are hoping to solve. Think of those goals again and translate them into something that we could think about measuring.

Goals / Context

For example, instead of an all reaching and broad‘Improve the lives of those affected by addiction’, we could look more specifically at ‘Decrease deaths linked to overdose’, ‘Improve the physical and psychological wellbeing of drug and alcohol users’ and ‘Improve the physical and psychological wellbeing of carers of drug and alcohol users’.

theory of change assumptions context inputs outputs outcomes context

Now we know where we’re heading, we can start looking at what we’re doing by jotting down what we activities we carry out to reach our goals. These are known as our inputs.

Inputs

In this example they could be things such as ‘Provide education about drug and alcohol at schools’, ‘run weekly meetings for addicts’ or ‘provide volunteer or job opportunities at the social enterprise.

theory of change assumptions context inputs outputs outcomes context

These inputs lead directly to an output, and they will sound very similar.

Outputs

For each educational course in a school, 30 students will receive 4 hours of information about drugs and alcohol.

For every weekly meeting, 15 individuals with an addiction will attend.

Of the volunteer/job opportunities, 3 individuals will take up this offer.

theory of change assumptions context inputs outputs outcomes context

So far, so good?

In fact many grants or contracts these days will only ask you to report this back to them with similar information, however they have become very output driven, without really thinking about the short, medium or long term impact of what they are funding. We know that it’s not just numbers that matter, but also what you’re offering and the quality of the service or product.

This is why we now think about the outcomes, some of which are easy to measure and some of which are challenging to. Furthermore, at this stage we need to think short, medium and long term in relation to what you’re doing. If you run a business, perhaps your long term could be from 10 years to a whole generation. If, on the other hand, you’re just looking at a year long pilot, then your long term could be between 3 and 5 years.

I’ll leave that up to you, and for now I’m going to focus on the outcomes for those taking up our volunteer/job opportunities, since this could be more relevant to those reading.

Outcomes

Short term — better and more structured routine, less likely to commit minor offences, unlikely to drink/use during the working day
Medium term — improved social skills, improved self-confidence, work ready, open to coming off unemployment benefits, new and better friendships outside of old ‘circles’
Long term — employed elsewhere, stronger personal relationships outside of old circle, no offending, not drinking/using or in control of drug/alcohol use

theory of change assumptions context inputs outputs outcomes context

You can now see that we have completed the bulk of our theory of change. We have looked at what we are going to do, how we are going to do it, and the effect over time we hope it to have on its users. One thing still remains, and that is our assumptions.

In everything we do, we assume that people will react a certain way, we predict that doing x will lead to y, and that we will achieve our goals. In both the business world and social sector, this doesn’t always happen, which is why we need to analyse our assumptions to make sure we don’t trip up.

We can look at our assumptions between each stage, and when we ask ourselves these questions, we can then strengthen what we are offering.

Have you ever heard of the NGO that gave out laptops to a village in Sub Sahara Africa, only to later find they were being used as paperweights? They’d made a lot of wrong assumptions — that the locals needed laptops, knew how to use them and had the power to run them, and ultimately didn’t reach their goal. Let’s not make the same mistake!

Assumptions

Inputs to Outputs

  • Users want to volunteer/work
  • Users want that sort of volunteer role/job position
  • Users will turn up as agreed to volunteer/work

Outputs to Outcomes

  • Users at a stage in recovery where reduction of using is possible
  • Users stick to the schedule given
  • Users will be physically/psychologically able to volunteer/work full time

Outcomes to Goal

  • Job secured leads to improve physical and psychological wellbeing
  • Job secured doesn’t lead to a return to old habits
theory of change assumptions context inputs outputs outcomes context

In this example, I have limited the assumptions for each stage, however it is important to list as many as possible and answer them prior to starting your project or organisation. The ones that are easier to answer can be removed when you feel you have adequately answered or countered it.

Putting together your theory of change should always be done with a wide range of stakeholders, to help combat these assumptions and really define what will work.

When I was part of setting up the social enterprise we used service user involvement to define how it would work that would make it more attractive to potential volunteers and employees. We involved them in the visual identity, branding, product list, product selection, setting of hours, role allocation and so much more.

They felt ownership from the beginning, which ensured many of our assumptions were solved. We offered flexible shifts, a relaxed work ethic, smart uniforms, suitable perks and everyone was trained to be a barista. They grew with confidence, made new friends, solved old problems and broke their own prejudices as well as fought stigma against addiction.

One only lasted a few months, he shared his views that it wasn’t right for him, not hands on enough and he didn’t want to be in that location. Others moved on to other jobs, and one or two still work their part time today.

The theory of change helped us take an idea, and turn it into reality to meet our goals. It’s not a complex thing to do, it doesn’t take weeks to do, and will really help you connect to your cause.

Give it a go and feel free to share what you’ve done or let us know if you’d like some help putting it together – michael@ensoco.co.uk

Originally posted at https://medium.com/@michaelfreersplit/applying-the-theory-of-change-e1f0f570ec12

How much profit should go towards your goal?

Reinvest, spend or share the wealth

A key element which puts the social into social enterprise is the way you spend your profits. Out with the idea that only shareholders or investors should benefit from the hard work of your company. Instead, it’s now time to invest in the wider community.

However as you navigate the literal world of social enterprise you will see a range of regulations or recommendations. Here we look at what exists in terms of asset locks, commitments and suggestions.

Legal structures, definition or certification

Community Interest Company (CiC), United Kingdom

Over in the UK, you can legally register as a social enterprise, locally known as a CiC. Once registered, the asset lock and dividend cap come into place. These ensure that the profit is either retained within the company or used to meet its social or environmental goals. This currently stands at 65%, meaning the rest can be paid out as dividends to the traditional shareholders or investors.

Social Traders definition, Australia

With no legal structure in Australia, things aren’t as clear cut as in the UK. Therefore many turn to the definition used by Social Traders in their FASES report, where it states that the majority of profit/surplus must be reinvested. Given that a majority can be 50.01%, any company that does this, either through reporting or constitutional locks can be classes as a social enterprise

Benefit Corporation, United States

Not to be confused with Certified BCorp, the Benefit Corporation is a legal structure with different rules on reporting per state. The main difference is that it gives the board the opportunity to make decisions based on both financial AND social reasons. This signifies a shift from the previous focus on a financial duty to shareholders. However there is nothing related to paying out dividends nor reinvesting profits.

What’s best for social business?

Three countries, three different set of rules. They do all protect the need for the triple bottom line, to ensure the organisation is able to make the social or environmental goal as important as the financial one. Which one goes far enough? There are arguments that dividend caps can share of investors, but this is why there is now a movement in the ‘impact investment world’.

Ultimately I would say, for trust purposes with both customers and stakeholders, having a legal requirement that a set percentage has to be committed, is better. You can build your business model around this, you can plan short, medium and long-term investment on it, and you can boast about it to the world.

What do you think is a reasonable percentage for reinvestment?

Originally published at https://medium.com/@michaelfreersplit/how-much-profit-should-go-towards-your-goal-167fe95a465a

Why we should always strive for an embedded model for our social enterprise

A look at which models exist and which are deemed ‘best’

The flexibility of social enterprise is something that makes it a lot more appealing than having to go the traditional non-profit route. However with a number of models out there, it can sometimes be hard to define which is and which isn’t a social enterprise.

You may have even heard in the news that Apple was moving towards being a social enterprise. Whilst many were quick to dismiss this based on the way Apple has worked, does work, and the cash reserves it holds, others had heard the term social enterprise for the first time and suddenly thought Apple was one such model. This is not the case.

At the other end of the scale, there is the myth that the organisation has to focus on employing people from a vulnerable group in order to be classed as a social enterprise. This is, in fact, a type of social enterprise known as WISE (work integrated social enterprise).


For those new to this sector, here are the the three most commonly talked about models in social enterprise, which each have a name that relates to the social/environmental cause.

Embedded model

Where the product or service directly provides the solution to the cause and is fully linked to the social or environmental goal(s).

For example, providing latrine solutions in a sustainable and entrepreneurial way when the organisational goal is to improve health and wellbeing whilst reducing attacks.

Integrated model

Where the product or service provides some crossover with the social or environmental goal(s). In some countries they are forced to use two legal entities — one for doing good and the other for making money.

For example, running a coffee shop which donates its profits back to the non-profit whilst also offering work for some of their users or clients.

External model

Where the product or service has very little to no connection with the social or environmental goal, and may even donate outside of the organisation.

For example, producing and selling wooden boxes whilst funding computer lessons for primary school students.


So now when you look at the models, you could potentially see how people thought Apple could even dare to think about becoming a social enterprise. Then we can think about a number of private corporations and how they, more and more, are donating to certain causes or sponsoring specific events.

Taking a step back from that, and looking at the integrated model. This is sometimes where social enterprises have found themselves struggling to make ends meet. Perhaps their product or service didn’t have the demand they had hoped. Perhaps what is a great cause just isn’t a sustainable business. These social enterprises pivot in three ways. They can  give up and collapse, innovate and stick to their guns, or find something that sells, even if it isn’t linked to their cause. It’s this last one that can commonly lead to an integrated model and can dilute the nature of the social enterprise.

Then we have the embedded model. Where the substance of everything you do is linked to your cause, it’s sustainable and you have impact pouring out of each department. Your suppliers are all social enterprises, your paper recycled in-house and you have a staff volunteering program with the local community. Social enterprise flows in the veins of everyone involved, directors, workers and buyers, and decisions are made with everyone’s best interest in mind.

It’s not hard to see why we should be striving for such a model. It’s not easy to get there, and definitely takes more effort and skill in navigating the business world we live in. Your original idea will have to be tweaked and improved, and if things aren’t going well then you will be faced with the three options mentioned earlier.

But just like any successful business, when you have that idea, and convince everyone it is the right product or service for them, this time with the added value of being an embedded social enterprise, you will be closer to dominating the market for years to come.

Originally posted on:

https://medium.com/@michaelfreersplit/why-we-should-always-strive-for-an-embedded-model-for-our-social-enterprise-6e66c854e9fd

Dear Social Enterprise,

It’s time we looked at our relationship.

I’ve fallen in love with you over the last ten years. Finally, I thought, the best of the private and civil sector can come together to solve social and environmental issues both big and small, and I can be a part of this world, of your world.

However right now, I feel like we’re going through a tough spell. It seems like not everyone likes you so much, and when people start doubting you, I have to admit, I start to second-guess my own feelings. I know I shouldn’t be pressured by my peers or by people I don’t even know, but sometimes it can be overwhelming.

“Why do you love Social Enterprise?” I’ve been asked on a number of occasions, and I tell them why I love you, with all my heart. “But why would you do that?!” they continue, and all I can say that, for me, it comes down to a feeling of what’s right or not.

I’ve been mulling over what they’ve said for a few months now, and I feel like I understand why not everyone is convinced by you, or even worse, they don’t even know you exist. I’m going to share the ‘why’ with you now, and hope we can fix these problems together.

You’re complicated

When I have to explain what you are exactly, I have to think about who I’m talking to. Where they’re from, what they do and why they do it.

I have to find examples that they can relate to, because not everyone knows Patagonia or Sanergy.

Then, I have to explain the legal nitty gritty about you, which in some cases doesn’t exist and instead I talk loosely about strategies and plans.

You’re just not so easy to define, and everyone has their own ideas of what you are, in some cases linking you to things such as socialism, communism, or hippies, instead of just doing good.

Your parents didn’t raise you so well

It’s easy to blame the parents, but lets face it, you were born out of the third sector. Your parents have loads of heart, and are perhaps idealists, but quite often lack the ‘head’ to steer you into being a real enterprise, and not just a charitable cause dependent on grants and donations.

They always needed your other relatives to join in and help, sometimes financially, but most often with leadership and guidance. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but when Uncle Unilever and Cousin Phillip Morris are giving advice on solving social or environmental problems, you should really take a step back and think.

You’re too quiet

When I walk into a room of business graduates, and start talking about social enterprise, I see blank faces I’m stunned. How the hell do these guys not know about you. I try to shout your name from the rooftops, promoting, education and consulting wherever I can, but it seems so many others aren’t.

Quite frankly you still haven’t found you voice. You haven’t shown people what you can do. You need to think about your PR and marketing which at the moment is close to non-existent.

Our relationship doesn’t have to be exclusive, I am in fact happy to share you with the whole world. I know you also want this, as it’s part of your goal that you often talk about. So please, please, please, find more spokespeople to represent you better and inspire others to start some sort of relationship with you.


I don’t know if anything in this letter to you is new, perhaps you’ve heard it from others but I just wanted you to know that I won’t lose faith in you. I will always sing your praises, and I will continue developing ideas with you in mind.

But we need to work on our relationship together, to make it stronger, and to stop people questioning whether it’s right or not.

Are you in?

Originally posted on: https://medium.com/@michaelfreer_2342/dear-social-enterprise-5fa3a4c3fd60

Social Enterprise in Focus : Who gives a crap? Australia

We’ve mentioned them before, and we’ll talk a bit more about them this time.

who gives a crap? is a social enterprise in Australia who sells toilet roll. Yes, toilet roll. They have a fitting name, an excellent mission and if you keep an eye on their social media sites, some hilarious marketing. They’ve since spread their operations to the U.S. and the U.K., and we hope to see their products in a supermarket near us all very soon.

They’re a great example of the triple bottom line, and deliver an interesting operation with elements of both the integrated and external social enterprise models:

People – with more people having mobile phones than toilets, they recognised the problem in in worldwide sanitation. Their mission is to reduce the -roughly- 40% of people who don’t have access to a toilet and improve the health and wellbeing of these people.

Planet – all the materials they source are forest friendly or recycled. This means they significantly reduce their carbon footprint and yours too – think about how many trees you flush down the toilet.

Profit – they donate 50% of their profits to partners also working in the field of sanitation- currently WaterAid and Sanergy.

If you want to find out about their more recent impact and good work – check out their ‘crap update‘. Otherwise, pop to their web shop and stock up on some toilet paper.

Social Enterprise in Focus : Ghana Bamboo Bikes, Ghana

You may read about the blue economy. The main goal is to source solve problems through what is available locally, without creating waste. This social enterprise from Ghana did just that.

Grown in Ghana, used in Ghana

With seven native species of bamboo locally, Ghana Bamboo Bikes has taken this readily available material and turned it into a social and environmental solution. They build and sell bikes as well as run a bike academy.

Socially, they create employment by first training people, most often women and some areas with a focus on youth, in how to assemble the bikes. Some of these individuals are employees whilst others have the chance to open their own bike shop anywhere in the country.

Meanwhile, on an environmental level they employ ten farmers to manage their bamboo plantations. Bamboo is as an alternative for existing fuel sources which can improve local forests and reduce soil erosion.

With one material they are doing so much for their country, you can read more about their impact here.

Your turn

Now think about what you have locally. Is there something growing in abundance that can be used to replace something man-made? There are lots of examples on the blue economy website so have a look and learn more.