Social Enterprise in Focus : VITA ANST, Croatia

This week we head to Split in Croatia to meet a local social enterprise.

Social entrepreneurship is a growing concept in Croatia. In 2015 the government launched a five year strategy which aims to develop and promote social enterprise across the nation, creating it in partnership with some key players such as ACT Grupa and CEDRA HR. A number of initiatives over the last couple of years have seen more funding opportunities for start-ups, which has also enhanced the reputation and knowledge of existing social enterprises.

One such social enterprise (in this case a social co-operative) is VITA-ANST. Founded in 2009, they have experienced ups and downs over the years, nevertheless they continue in their commitment to support people with addictions. They run both an NGO (ANST 1700) and the social co-operative to enable them to run support programs as well as work in the rehabilitation and reintegration of people recovering from addictions. The social co-operative produce bright and colourful souvenirs for the tourist market, as well as bespoke frames for pictures or posters for the home.

We caught up with Gabrijela Frakić, Vice President of the NGO, to tell us more about VITA-ANST.

Why did you decide to open a social enterprise (socijalna zadruga)?
From the very beginning we offered therapy in the form of art and craft. Through this we realised we could create a self-sustainable model and therefore the need to open a social co-operative arose. It enabled us to separate the business (in terms of product placement) and social activities. It also meant it was easier to promote and sell things since at the time it wasn’t possible to do this through NGOs.
 
What has been the most difficult thing in running a social enterprise in Croatia?
There are a few current issues regarding social co-operatives generally in Croatia. There isn’t a defined status of social co-operatives in the tax system and furthermore there’s a general lack of support from local administration. In addition to this there is insufficient knowledge of social entrepreneurship generally. Finally, there’s a lack of development support such as training or workshops around capacity building and there aren’t many financial tools available for market expansion.
 
What advice would you give to individuals thinking of opening their own social enterprise in Croatia?
In terms of a co-operative, make sure all members have common interests and there is someone who can lead or manage everything with excellence and professionalism. Then, with the right vision, there are possibilities out there but you have to persevere and learn how to deal best with external issues such as the legal and economic situation. Finally, whether you offer a service or a product, ensure you are always improving the quality of what you offer. It may be slow at times but it will enable you to expand and reach wider markets.
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In our next blog post we’ll be explaining more about what a social enterprise is.

The start

I spend a lot of my time browsing the internet for news about social entrepreneurship (in between the obligatory checking of Facebook and e-mail). Hearing about other people’s ideas, experiences and hopes motivates me on a daily basis, and I like to share these ideas at every opportunity, be in a workshop or lecture.

Now I will be doing it online. I have toyed with the exact medium for a while now, debating whether to do it by video, blog or podcast, and since I couldn’t decide then I thought it should be all three and whichever suits the news best.

If you are a social enterprise or entrepreneur, I would love to talk to you and share your good news, so please get in touch.

For now I’ll leave you with a few websites for social enterprise action:

Social enterprise magazine
www.tiltmag.org

Great online courses
http://plusacumen.org/courses/

Best named social enterprise?
https://au.whogivesacrap.org/