The least well-known yet most famous social enterprises

Most of my presentations start off in the same way.

“Do you know what a social enterprise is?”

Normally the answer is either a ‘no’ or a ‘kinda’. However as soon as I mention a few companies as examples, most of the audience has a better idea, whilst others are in shock. They ask how it’s possible that they know of the company, and in some cases shop their regularly, but never knew they were a social enterprise.

The answer is simple. Social enterprise is such a new term that it’s easier to market the specific things you do, rather than using an umbrella term which should hit the nail on the head.

Read more here: https://medium.com/@michaelfreersplit/the-least-well-known-yet-most-famous-social-enterprises-2427a0961e97

Encouraging Entrepreneurship in Teenagers

Through engaging, interactive and hands-on workshops

I was fortunate to have an amazing Business Studies teacher at secondary school. She inspired me to explore the world of business as I do today. She had the right approach with us, spoke with enthusiasm and energy and made her own clothes. She stood out from the rest for a number of other reasons too.

This was despite the fact that the majority of our work was paper or case study based.

We never set up a lemonade stand.

We never sold cookies door to door.

We only once had to come up with business ideas.

Read more here: https://medium.com/@michaelfreersplit/encouraging-entrepreneurship-in-teenagers-cfeae4702659

Balancing your head and your heart

Profit vs People vs Planet

I was recently training a group of current and potential social entrepreneurs about key stakeholders and how to ensure their buy-in at all stages from idea to execution. We discussed various methods, channels of communication, tools such as Social Return on Investment and how to share stories in a convincing and moving way.

I also got the participants to do a small quiz on how they make decisions. Overwhelmingly, the outcome was that most people supposedly used their head rather than their heart, however at the end of the workshop one lady came up to me and shared her current situation.

Read more here.. https://medium.com/@michaelfreersplit/balancing-your-head-and-your-heart-f117fe283905

Solving problems through social enterprise

Using the five whys to break things down

If you start thinking about all the global issues out there, you’re likely to get pretty depressed. They’re so big that you sometimes feel unable to change anything, and even if you try to change things it’s on such a small scale that it’s hard to see the impact.

Read more here:
https://medium.com/@michaelfreersplit/solving-problems-through-social-enterprise-16fdfd6b2a02

Types of Social Enterprise — Embedded Models

A seamless model of impact and profit

Having previously looked at the external and integrated models, we move to the third model of social enterprise — the embedded model.

This model rarely exists unless the organisation was born as a social enterprise, as advanced planning and strategical thinking is required.

Read more on Medium –
https://medium.com/@michaelfreersplit/types-of-social-enterprise-embedded-models-99e3d3625647

Types of Social Enterprise — Integrated Model

When operations and impact overlap slightly.

In a previous blog post we looked at the different types of social enterprise model, and this time we’re delving deeper into the integrated model.

The integrated model often sees a social enterprise’s income generating activity partly fund some of the social activities within the social enterprise. At the same time the business side of things will also directly contribute to other forms of social good. However the product or service they offer is unlikely to solve some sort social or environmental need.

Read more here:
https://medium.com/@michaelfreersplit/types-of-social-enterprise-integrated-model-b70af2355570

Types of Social Enterprise — External Model

When your operations and impact don’t overlap

In a previous blog post we looked at the different types of social enterprise model, and this time we’re going to go one step further by discussing some examples of the external model.

The external model is very interesting because it actually means any business can jump straight into being a social enterprise without necessary having any social or environmental goals linked directly to their product or service.

Read more here:
https://medium.com/@michaelfreersplit/types-of-social-enterprise-external-model-a35d1cabc57c

Applying the Theory of Change

Demonstrating your social enterprise’s worth

If you work for a non-profit, social enterprise or do anything that aims to have a positive social or environmental effect, then you might have thought about your theory of change.

Your theory of change should show how what you do, has an impact more far reaching than just on your customers and users. It should also show how you aim to create impact for longer than just the instance they buy your product or use your service.

It’s a strategic piece of work that can set down the foundations for your business, test your assumptions and ensure you have indicators to show the world how great you are. So let’s delve a little deeper into what’s involved.


When you started your organisation or project, you would have seen a problem you were hoping to solve. This provides your context that your theory of change relates to.

On top of this, you would have most likely stated your mission and vision. Ultimately the goals you, as an individual or group of individuals, are hoping to solve. Think of those goals again and translate them into something that we could think about measuring.

Goals / Context

For example, instead of an all reaching and broad‘Improve the lives of those affected by addiction’, we could look more specifically at ‘Decrease deaths linked to overdose’, ‘Improve the physical and psychological wellbeing of drug and alcohol users’ and ‘Improve the physical and psychological wellbeing of carers of drug and alcohol users’.

theory of change assumptions context inputs outputs outcomes context

Now we know where we’re heading, we can start looking at what we’re doing by jotting down what we activities we carry out to reach our goals. These are known as our inputs.

Inputs

In this example they could be things such as ‘Provide education about drug and alcohol at schools’, ‘run weekly meetings for addicts’ or ‘provide volunteer or job opportunities at the social enterprise.

theory of change assumptions context inputs outputs outcomes context

These inputs lead directly to an output, and they will sound very similar.

Outputs

For each educational course in a school, 30 students will receive 4 hours of information about drugs and alcohol.

For every weekly meeting, 15 individuals with an addiction will attend.

Of the volunteer/job opportunities, 3 individuals will take up this offer.

theory of change assumptions context inputs outputs outcomes context

So far, so good?

In fact many grants or contracts these days will only ask you to report this back to them with similar information, however they have become very output driven, without really thinking about the short, medium or long term impact of what they are funding. We know that it’s not just numbers that matter, but also what you’re offering and the quality of the service or product.

This is why we now think about the outcomes, some of which are easy to measure and some of which are challenging to. Furthermore, at this stage we need to think short, medium and long term in relation to what you’re doing. If you run a business, perhaps your long term could be from 10 years to a whole generation. If, on the other hand, you’re just looking at a year long pilot, then your long term could be between 3 and 5 years.

I’ll leave that up to you, and for now I’m going to focus on the outcomes for those taking up our volunteer/job opportunities, since this could be more relevant to those reading.

Outcomes

Short term — better and more structured routine, less likely to commit minor offences, unlikely to drink/use during the working day
Medium term — improved social skills, improved self-confidence, work ready, open to coming off unemployment benefits, new and better friendships outside of old ‘circles’
Long term — employed elsewhere, stronger personal relationships outside of old circle, no offending, not drinking/using or in control of drug/alcohol use

theory of change assumptions context inputs outputs outcomes context

You can now see that we have completed the bulk of our theory of change. We have looked at what we are going to do, how we are going to do it, and the effect over time we hope it to have on its users. One thing still remains, and that is our assumptions.

In everything we do, we assume that people will react a certain way, we predict that doing x will lead to y, and that we will achieve our goals. In both the business world and social sector, this doesn’t always happen, which is why we need to analyse our assumptions to make sure we don’t trip up.

We can look at our assumptions between each stage, and when we ask ourselves these questions, we can then strengthen what we are offering.

Have you ever heard of the NGO that gave out laptops to a village in Sub Sahara Africa, only to later find they were being used as paperweights? They’d made a lot of wrong assumptions — that the locals needed laptops, knew how to use them and had the power to run them, and ultimately didn’t reach their goal. Let’s not make the same mistake!

Assumptions

Inputs to Outputs

  • Users want to volunteer/work
  • Users want that sort of volunteer role/job position
  • Users will turn up as agreed to volunteer/work

Outputs to Outcomes

  • Users at a stage in recovery where reduction of using is possible
  • Users stick to the schedule given
  • Users will be physically/psychologically able to volunteer/work full time

Outcomes to Goal

  • Job secured leads to improve physical and psychological wellbeing
  • Job secured doesn’t lead to a return to old habits
theory of change assumptions context inputs outputs outcomes context

In this example, I have limited the assumptions for each stage, however it is important to list as many as possible and answer them prior to starting your project or organisation. The ones that are easier to answer can be removed when you feel you have adequately answered or countered it.

Putting together your theory of change should always be done with a wide range of stakeholders, to help combat these assumptions and really define what will work.

When I was part of setting up the social enterprise we used service user involvement to define how it would work that would make it more attractive to potential volunteers and employees. We involved them in the visual identity, branding, product list, product selection, setting of hours, role allocation and so much more.

They felt ownership from the beginning, which ensured many of our assumptions were solved. We offered flexible shifts, a relaxed work ethic, smart uniforms, suitable perks and everyone was trained to be a barista. They grew with confidence, made new friends, solved old problems and broke their own prejudices as well as fought stigma against addiction.

One only lasted a few months, he shared his views that it wasn’t right for him, not hands on enough and he didn’t want to be in that location. Others moved on to other jobs, and one or two still work their part time today.

The theory of change helped us take an idea, and turn it into reality to meet our goals. It’s not a complex thing to do, it doesn’t take weeks to do, and will really help you connect to your cause.

Give it a go and feel free to share what you’ve done or let us know if you’d like some help putting it together – michael@ensoco.co.uk

Originally posted at https://medium.com/@michaelfreersplit/applying-the-theory-of-change-e1f0f570ec12

How much profit should go towards your goal?

Reinvest, spend or share the wealth

A key element which puts the social into social enterprise is the way you spend your profits. Out with the idea that only shareholders or investors should benefit from the hard work of your company. Instead, it’s now time to invest in the wider community.

However as you navigate the literal world of social enterprise you will see a range of regulations or recommendations. Here we look at what exists in terms of asset locks, commitments and suggestions.

Legal structures, definition or certification

Community Interest Company (CiC), United Kingdom

Over in the UK, you can legally register as a social enterprise, locally known as a CiC. Once registered, the asset lock and dividend cap come into place. These ensure that the profit is either retained within the company or used to meet its social or environmental goals. This currently stands at 65%, meaning the rest can be paid out as dividends to the traditional shareholders or investors.

Social Traders definition, Australia

With no legal structure in Australia, things aren’t as clear cut as in the UK. Therefore many turn to the definition used by Social Traders in their FASES report, where it states that the majority of profit/surplus must be reinvested. Given that a majority can be 50.01%, any company that does this, either through reporting or constitutional locks can be classes as a social enterprise

Benefit Corporation, United States

Not to be confused with Certified BCorp, the Benefit Corporation is a legal structure with different rules on reporting per state. The main difference is that it gives the board the opportunity to make decisions based on both financial AND social reasons. This signifies a shift from the previous focus on a financial duty to shareholders. However there is nothing related to paying out dividends nor reinvesting profits.

What’s best for social business?

Three countries, three different set of rules. They do all protect the need for the triple bottom line, to ensure the organisation is able to make the social or environmental goal as important as the financial one. Which one goes far enough? There are arguments that dividend caps can share of investors, but this is why there is now a movement in the ‘impact investment world’.

Ultimately I would say, for trust purposes with both customers and stakeholders, having a legal requirement that a set percentage has to be committed, is better. You can build your business model around this, you can plan short, medium and long-term investment on it, and you can boast about it to the world.

What do you think is a reasonable percentage for reinvestment?

Originally published at https://medium.com/@michaelfreersplit/how-much-profit-should-go-towards-your-goal-167fe95a465a